Bioplastics sourced from wood

The shift from fossil-based industries to a bioeconomy is creating a growing demand for biobased chemicals, materials and fuels as sustainable and renewable alternatives. One possible source is fructose from wood for use in the production of bioplastics.

Lignocellulosic biomass is typically nonedible plant material, including dedicated crops of wood and grass, as well as waste material from agroforestry. It is also the single most abundant renewable resource on earth and available all year round. Furthermore, lignocellulosic biomass does not need valuable space in fields as it has no agricultural or nutritional use. It’s noteworthy, that wood can be harvested sustainably from certified forests. In the Nordic countries, more forest is grown than gets harvested each year.

Compared to other lignocellulosic feedstocks like straw, wood-based feedstocks for biorefinery have the greatest potential to replace fossil derived compounds in the chemical industry. Establishing competitive value chains based on lignocellulosic feedstock will not only secure an abundant alternative industrial feedstock but also strengthen the competitive position of biobased chemicals and materials compared to their fossil-based counterparts.

The EU-funded Horizon 2020 ReTAPP project investigated the production of fructose sugar using lignocellulosic biomass from hardwood and softwood feedstocks. “Researchers employed enzyme solutions to replace food/starch-based-fructose with wood derived fructose and prepared the entire value chain for launching the product onto the market,” says project coordinator Matti Heikkilä.

Source: Bioplastics sourced from wood – CORDIS, European Commission, 2018-09-24