Exploring How and Why Trees ‘Talk’ to Each Other

Ecologist Suzanne Simard has shown how trees use a network of soil fungi to communicate their needs and aid neighboring plants. Now she’s warning that threats like clear-cutting and climate change could disrupt these critical networks.

Source: Exploring How and Why Trees ‘Talk’ to Each Other by Diane Toomey: Yale Environment 360

California cap-and-trade expenditure deal benefits biomass

The California legislature has passed legislation that aims, in part, to support existing biomass plants within the state. The bill, SB 859, features an expenditure plan for unallocated cap-and-trade proceeds.

Source: California cap-and-trade expenditure deal benefits biomass | Biomassmagazine.com

New policy for Rwanda urban forestry

Officials say unselective species of trees have been planted across Kigali – the capital of Rwanda – and other towns around the country with no regard to international standards for urban forestry. It is against this background that the government has embarked on formulating a policy, which will complement the Kigali City Master plan and the national green-growth agenda. This is so property developers also get to plan for urban afforestation while putting into consideration specific species of trees to grow in cities and towns.

Source: New policy for Rwanda urban forestry

North Carolina wilderness recommendations face challenging political path

Next year, the U.S. Forest Service may take action on recommending that new acreage within Western North Carolina’s two national forests be added to the National Wilderness Preservation System as part of the ongoing Pisgah-Nantahala National Forest management plan revision process slated to be finalized in 2017.

Whatever the Forest Service recommends, approval will depend on congressional action. The positions of the House and Senate members who represent potential wilderness areas can be expect to have a substantial effect on the outcome of the political process.

Source: Wilderness recommendations face challenging political path

Where have all the aspen gone?

Aspen numbers are declining in the Bighorns. They have been for decades. Though there aren’t a lot of studies that provide the concrete numbers behind the decline, it’s enough of a decline that it’s visually obvious for many who’ve spent years working and recreating in the area.
That decline is concerning for foresters and biologists because aspen are a keystone and pioneer species. They provide wildlife habitat, and produce forage, help maintain water quality, provide recreational sites and add variety to the viewshed.

Source: Where have all the aspen gone?

Global researchers provide positive assessment for advanced biomass gasification

A new review paper published in journal Energy & Environmental Science presents a case for biomass gasification as a promising, viable and economically beneficial technology for fuel and energy.

Source: Global researchers give thumbs up to advanced biomass gasification | Bioenergy Insight Magazine

Parks Canada releases Mountain Pine Beetle plan

On August 15, Parks Canada released its mountain pine beetle management plan for Jasper National Park. The plan includes several strategies to slow the eastward spread of the beetle, including using prescribed burns, cutting down individual/multiple trees and using harvesting equipment to eliminate larger patches of infected forest.

Source: Parks releases Mountain Pine Beetle plan – Jasper’s source for news, sports, arts, culture, and more | The Fitzhugh

Report details Canada’s advanced biofuel, wood pellet markets

The USDA Foreign Agricultural Service recently released a Global Agricultural Information Network report on the Canadian renewable fuel industry, which reviews the country’s renewable fuel mandates/policy and progress toward meeting them, as well as biofuel and wood pellet market development, imports and exports.

Source: Report details Canada’s advanced biofuel, wood pellet markets | Biomassmagazine.com