EU to license Indonesian timber in effort to reduce illegal cutting

The EU said last week that Indonesia is the first country to qualify for the licenses. It will mean that traders of goods such as wooden furniture, plywood and paper that earn the certification will find it easier to do business with Europe.

But some environmental and civil society groups are already concerned the licensing system could become a conduit for illegal timber from a country where tropical forests are being cut down at an epic rate.

Source: EU to license Indonesian timber in effort to reduce illegal cutting

Forest Service chief looks to partnerships for forest management

U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell said his agency is trying to manage 60 million acres in need of restoration with 40 percent fewer staff and dollars than he had a decade ago.

“We need to focus on large landscapes, where we’re treating private land and national forest at the same time,” Tidwell said. “And we really need to focus on the outcomes we’re after – healthy, resilient forests that withstand disease outbreaks, fires, drought conditions that we’ll all face in the future. That’s the thing that produces economic activity that sustains communities and eliminates some of the conflict we’re seeing. That’s something we’ve been trying to address for decades in the agency.”

Source: Forest Service chief looks to partnerships for forest management | Local | missoulian.com

First Forester: The Enduring Conservation Legacy of Gifford Pinchot

Gifford Pinchot, the first U.S. forest chief and founder of the Yale Forest School, doesn’t get enough credit, says historian Char Miller. In the early 20th century, Miller says, Pinchot helped shape our modern understanding of conservation, environmental education, and the very notion of “public lands.”

Source: First Forester: The Enduring Conservation Legacy of Gifford Pinchot

SFI Engages the International Forest Community through PEFC Endorsement

The Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) Inc. announced that the SFI 2015-2019 Forest Management Standard has again met the rigorous third-party assessment of the Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC). This is SFI’s fourth PEFC assessment. The SFI Program was first endorsed in 2005. PEFC is an umbrella organization that endorses national forest certification systems developed collaboratively by diverse stakeholders, tailored to local priorities and conditions.

Source: The Sustainable Forestry Initiative Continues To Engage The International Forest Community Through

Ash and Emerald Ash Borer: How Do Trees Defend Themselves from a Deadly Beetle?

Justin Whitehill is hopeful that “we will eventually be able to produce EAB-resistant ash trees by borrowing from other ash trees that have natural resistance. Applying modern genomic technologies to conventional tree-breeding methods has the potential to preserve not only a single species, but a whole genus that is being impacted worldwide.”

Source: Ash and Emerald Ash Borer: How Do Trees Defend Themselves from a Deadly Beetle? – Entomology Today

Forest Service unleashes secret weapon on tree-killing beetles: wasps

Paul Merten has spent nearly a decade chasing down a killer in the Southern Appalachians, armed with no more than a pocket knife and measuring tape.But recently the entomologist with the U.S. Forest Service in Asheville, N.C., has been homing in on the tiny, yet lethal pest with what he hopes is a secret weapon — parasitoids, also known as wasps.Merten and Haywood County Community College forestry student Caroline McGough were deep in the woods on the Appalachian Trail slicing across the North Carolina-Tennessee border last week, unleashing parasitoids in a science fiction-like attack on the emerald ash borer.

Source: Forest Service unleashes secret weapon on tree-killing beetles: wasps

Softwood lumber dispute: American consumers have lost nearly $6 billion since 2006

The tariff barriers imposed on Canadian softwood lumber cost American consumers a fortune, all while enriching a limited group of producers, shows a Viewpoint published today by the Montreal Economic Institute (MEI), a Canadian public policy research center.

Since the entry into force of the latest Softwood Lumber Agreement between Canada and the United States, tariffs at the border have reduced Canadian exports and have allowed American producers to increase their market shares. The latter thus registered additional net earnings of US$4.31 billion between 2006 and 2015.

American consumers, however, are the big losers of this deal. Since the Canadian lumber targeted by the Agreement is used primarily for residential construction on the American market, American consumers have had to get their wood from an alternative and more expensive source.

Source: Softwood lumber dispute: American consumers have lost nearly $6 billion since 2006

AFF Releases its New Report: Southern Wildlife At-risk

According to a new report by the American Forest Foundation, Southern Wildlife At Risk: Family Forest Owners Offer a Solution, family landowners, who own the majority (58 percent) of forests in the South, are key to providing forested habitat for at-risk species. Eighty-seven percent of landowners in the South say protecting and improving wildlife habitat is the top reason they own land. In addition, 73 percent state they want to do more on their land for wildlife in the future. Landowners cite an uncertainty about whether they are doing right by their land, difficulty finding support and the cost of management, as barriers.

Source: AFF Releases its New Report: Southern Wildlife At-risk

Indian foresters at greater risk than those of other countries

DEHRADUN: India has been leading for many successive years for having the maximum casualties of foresters for the same pursuits, in comparison with Asia, Africa, America.

Shashi Kumar, director-general of Indian Council of Forestry Research and Education, said “There is conflict of interests and incidents such as forest fire etc which is resulting into deaths of foresters. Human-wildlife interface has also increased many notches above. The area of wildlife is disturbed because of several reasons, resulting into human-wildlife conflict on constant rise. Our front line forces are not equipped to face this challenge. They lack the modern training and equipment.”

Source: India has the maximum casulties of foresters in comparison to other Asian, American and African countries – Times of India