Are Trees Sentient Beings? Certainly, Says German Forester

In an interview with Yale Environment 360, Wohlleben, author of The Hidden Life of Trees, discusses how trees are sophisticated organisms that live in families, support their sick neighbors, and have the capacity to make decisions and fight off predators. He has been criticized for anthropomorphizing trees, but Wohlleben, 52, maintains that to succeed in preserving our forests in a rapidly warming world, we must start to look at trees in an entirely different light.

Source: Are Trees Sentient Beings? Certainly, Says German Forester – Yale Environment 360

Variable tree growth after fire protects forests from future bark beetle outbreaks

Do severe wildfires make forests in the western United States more susceptible to future bark beetle outbreaks?

The answer, in a study published Monday (Nov. 7, 2016) in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is no. By leading to variability in the density and size of trees that grow during recovery, large fires reduce the future vulnerability of forests to bark beetle attacks and broad-scale outbreaks.
“Fire creates a very heterogeneous landscape,” says study co-author Kenneth Raffa, professor of entomology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. “Beetles can only reproduce in an individual tree once, so they take advantage of this patch of trees and that patch of trees as they become available, but when the number and size of trees vary a lot, it’s hard for a large outbreak to develop.”

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-11-variable-tree-growth-forests-future.html#jCp

Source: Variable tree growth after fire protects forests from future bark beetle outbreaks

Team studies fires this year in ’88 Yellowstone burn areas

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — Nearly three decades ago, huge wildfires burned about a third of Yellowstone National Park. The park has seen wildfires every year since, but the forests of new trees that grew in the scars of those 1988 fires have helped curb their size and intensity — until now.

Source: Team studies fires this year in ’88 Yellowstone burn areas

Exploring How and Why Trees ‘Talk’ to Each Other

Ecologist Suzanne Simard has shown how trees use a network of soil fungi to communicate their needs and aid neighboring plants. Now she’s warning that threats like clear-cutting and climate change could disrupt these critical networks.

Source: Exploring How and Why Trees ‘Talk’ to Each Other by Diane Toomey: Yale Environment 360