Two ways to settle the latest Canada-U.S. softwood lumber dispute

The standstill agreement on softwood lumber trade expired recently, leaving Canadians holding their breath for the U.S. Lumber Coalition to launch legal proceedings.

In the calm before the storm of the next Canada-U.S. softwood lumber dispute, speculation about how the issue will unfold has crystallized around two options: a tax or a quota. The differences may appear merely technical, but they would mean vastly different things economically.

While a quota would impose a cap on exports to the United States, a tax would allow the level of exports to fluctuate with U.S. consumers’ willingness to pay for Canadian lumber. In other words, as U.S. lumber prices increase, Canadian lumber would still be able to enter the U.S. market to meet demand.

Source: Two ways to settle the latest Canada-U.S. softwood lumber dispute – The Globe and Mail

Call for global action to stamp out illegal timber trade

A group of conservation scientists and policy makers led by University of Adelaide researchers are calling for global action to combat the illegal timber trade.

They say governments and organisations responsible for protecting wildlife and forests around the world and certification schemes need to “catch up with the science” and put in place policies and frameworks to ensure the legality of timber being logged and traded around the world.

Consumers, too, need to play their part in demanding verification of the origin and legality of the timber items they buy, they say.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-11-global-action-illegal-timber.html#jCp

Source: Call for global action to stamp out illegal timber trade – phys.org

FAO and Partners Launch Sourcebook on National Socioeconomic Forestry Surveys

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO) Forestry Department and its partners published ‘National Socioeconomic Surveys in Forestry: Guidance and Survey Modules for Measuring the Multiple Roles of Forests in Household Welfare and Livelihoods’. The Sourcebook aims to fill the data gap on the contributions that forests and wild products make to livelihoods and well-being. The modules and guidance presented aim to build the capacity of national statistical offices to integrate forest values into national household surveys, in particular surveys based on the World Bank’s Living Standards Measurement Study (LSMS).

Source: FAO and Partners Launch Sourcebook on National Socioeconomic Forestry Surveys | SDG Knowledge Hub | IISD

Swiss forests need intervention to survive future climate

Forests in Switzerland can adapt to a certain extent to climate change but will need forward-thinking management to remain productive and provide ecological services, say experts.
The Swiss environment ministry and the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL) have presented key recommendations based on a seven-year research programme dedicated to understanding how best to help Swiss forests weather climate change.
At a press conference in Birmensdorf, Zurich on Monday, the study leaders said that the results provide a first comprehensive view for central Europe of the impacts of climate change on forest species, and the multiple services that forests provide.
They said that climate change will have a profound impact on Swiss forests, resulting notably in the shifting of vegetation zones some 500-700 metres (1,640-2,297 feet) higher in altitude, as well as more frequent periods of drought, forest fires and pest infestations.
Trees that germinate and begin growing in Switzerland today will already experience a marked change in climate during their lifetime, the researchers said. They emphasised that adapting our forest management practices will be essential to helping Swiss forests survive climate change, and continue to provide the key services humans rely on, such as wood production and shelter from natural hazards.

Source: Swiss forests need intervention to survive future climate – SWI swissinfo.ch

Significant deforestation in Brazilian Amazon goes undetected, study finds

Efforts by the Brazilian government over the past 15 years to curb deforestation have been a widely celebrated success, but a new study finds that there’s more deforestation happening in Brazil than official accounts suggest.

The study, led by researchers from Brown University, compared data from Brazil’s official Monitoring Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon by Satellite Project (PRODES) with two independent satellite measures of forest cover. The study found that about 9,000 square kilometers of forestland not included in PRODES monitoring were cleared from 2008 to 2012. That’s an area roughly the size of Puerto Rico.

“PRODES has been an incredible monitoring tool and has facilitated the successful enforcement of policies,” said Leah VanWey, co-author of the research and senior deputy director at the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society. “But we show evidence that landowners are working around it in ways that are destroying important forests.”
The research is published in the journal Conservation Letters.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-10-significant-deforestation-brazilian-amazon-undetected.html#jCp

Source: Significant deforestation in Brazilian Amazon goes undetected, study finds – Phys.org

Timber species added to CITES list

World governments currently meeting in Johannesburg have strongly backed the introduction of stronger measures to protect commercially traded timber species.

Delegates to the 17th Conference to the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES CoP17) voted to list the entire Dalbergia genus within Appendix II of the Convention as well as three species of Guibourtia from Central Africa and Pterocarpus erinaceus from West Africa.

The Appendix II listings mean control measures will be put in place to control commercial international trade in the species.

Source: TRAFFIC – Wildlife Trade News – Solid backing for timber at CITES

Social forestry: Where are we now?

As a celebration of social forestry initiatives in Indonesia, a festival showcasing stories of community-managed forests around the archipelago was held in Jakarta last week by the Ministry of Environment and Forestry.

The event took place more than a year after the launch of the Indonesian government’s ambitious program targeted at allocating 12.7 million hectares of forests to be managed by communities through social forestry schemes, as well as forming partnerships for collaborative forest management.The target has been part of the government’s five year plan (2015-2019), which means that there should be more than 2.5 million hectares of forests allocated for communities each year.

Source: Social forestry: Where are we now? – Opinion – The Jakarta Post

Indian foresters at greater risk than those of other countries

DEHRADUN: India has been leading for many successive years for having the maximum casualties of foresters for the same pursuits, in comparison with Asia, Africa, America.

Shashi Kumar, director-general of Indian Council of Forestry Research and Education, said “There is conflict of interests and incidents such as forest fire etc which is resulting into deaths of foresters. Human-wildlife interface has also increased many notches above. The area of wildlife is disturbed because of several reasons, resulting into human-wildlife conflict on constant rise. Our front line forces are not equipped to face this challenge. They lack the modern training and equipment.”

Source: India has the maximum casulties of foresters in comparison to other Asian, American and African countries – Times of India