Pando, the Most Massive Organism on Earth, Is Shrinking

By JoAnna Klein
The grove of 47,000 quivering aspen trees in Utah is being diminished by mule deer, foraging cattle and human mismanagement.

On 106 acres in Fishlake National Forest in Richfield, Utah, a 13-million-pound giant has been looming for thousands of years. But few people have ever heard of him.

This is “the Trembling Giant,” or Pando, from the Latin word for “I spread.” A single clone, and genetically male, he is the most massive organism on Earth. He is a forest of one: a grove of some 47,000 quivering aspen trees — Populus tremuloides — connected by a single root system, and all with the same DNA.

But this majestic behemoth may be more of a Goliath, suggests a study published Wednesday in PLOS ONE. Threatened by herds of hungry animals and human encroachment, Pando is fighting a losing battle.

The study, consisting of recent ground surveys and an analysis of 72 years of aerial photographs, revealed that this unrealized natural treasure and keystone species — with hundreds of dependents — is shrinking. And without more careful management of the forest, and the mule deer and cattle that forage within him, the Trembling Giant will continue to dwindle.

Source: Pando, the Most Massive Organism on Earth, Is Shrinking – New York Times, 2018-10-17

Where have all the aspen gone?

Aspen numbers are declining in the Bighorns. They have been for decades. Though there aren’t a lot of studies that provide the concrete numbers behind the decline, it’s enough of a decline that it’s visually obvious for many who’ve spent years working and recreating in the area.
That decline is concerning for foresters and biologists because aspen are a keystone and pioneer species. They provide wildlife habitat, and produce forage, help maintain water quality, provide recreational sites and add variety to the viewshed.

Source: Where have all the aspen gone?