Under Attack, foresters suspend patrolling, fire duty

By Amit S Upadhye, Bengaluru, India
Backed by political leaders and anti social elements, the villagers living around the Cauvery Wildlife Sanctuary are resorting to attacks on forest officials. The attacks are on the rise after the recent shootout incident where a resident of Doddahalli was shot dead.

Fearing more attacks, the foresters have suspended patrolling duties in the sanctuary. The foresters who retaliated a shooting group and killed a poacher are now demanding police protection for them and their family members.

Source: Under Attack, foresters suspend patrolling, fire duty- The New Indian Express, 2017-03-21

Greens, loggers axe forest plan

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By Matthew Denholm
Controversial plans by Tasmania’s government to open up 350,000 hectares of former protected forests for logging have been undermined by the peak timber industry group joining environmentalists in united opposition.

In a major embarrassment for the Hodgman Liberal government, the pro-logging legislation it had hoped would shore up votes in regional seats ahead of a state election is now opposed by the influential Forest Industries Association of Tasmania.

FIAT today issued a statement announcing it would join the Greens and Wilderness Society in fighting the government’s Forestry (Unlocking Production Forests) Bill, at least in its current form.

“We have advised the government that we are unable to support the bill … as it will create unnecessary sovereign risk in log supply and problems in our markets and a return to the ‘forestry wars’,” said FIAT chief executive Terry Edwards.

Mr Edwards said the industry did not accept the central premise of the legislation: that opening up the forests, which include highly contentious areas on Bruny Island, as well as in Wielangta, the Blue Tier and the Tarkine, was needed to protect jobs.

Source: Greens, loggers axe forest plan – The Australian, 2017-03-15

Humans have destroyed 7% of Earth’s pristine forest landscapes just since 2000

By Chelsea Harvey
The world’s natural places are disappearing at a galloping clip, says a new study, released Friday in the journal Science Advances. It suggests that more than 7 percent of Earth’s natural, intact forest landscapes have been lost since 2000 — and these ecosystems may be in danger of disappearing entirely from at least 19 countries in the next 60 years.

These landscapes represent some of “the last portions of the Earth that are not significantly affected by human influence,” said Lars Laestadius, a forest expert, consultant on natural resources policy and co-author of the new study. “As we lose these, we lose something that is bigger than ourselves.”

The study defines “intact forest landscapes” as areas greater than 500 square kilometers, or 193 square miles, containing a mosaic of forests and other associated ecosystems, such as plains or wetlands. The key is that these areas must be undisturbed by human activities — they can’t be fragmented by roads or deforestation or other industrial operations. Once that happens, the ecosystems cease to be considered “intact.” And as the new study indicates, this is happening more and more frequently around the world.

Source: Humans have destroyed 7% of Earth’s pristine forest landscapes just since 2000 – The Washington Post, 2017-01-13

The Influence of Forest Management Regimes on Deforestation in a Central Indian Dry Deciduous Forest Landscape

This research examines the impact of forest management regimes, with various degrees of restriction, on forest conservation in a dry deciduous Indian forest landscape. Forest change is mapped using Landsat satellite images from 1977, 1990, 1999, and 2011. The landscape studied has lost 1478 km2 of dense forest cover between 1977 and 2011, with a maximum loss of 1002 km2 of dense forest between 1977 and 1990. The number of protected forest areas has increased, concomitant with an increase in restrictions on forest access and use outside protected areas. Interviews with residents of 20 randomly selected villages indicate that in the absence of alternatives, rather than reducing their dependence on forests, communities appear to shift their use to other, less protected patches of forest. Pressure shifts seem to be taking place as a consequence of increasing protection, from within protected areas to forests outside, leading to the creation of protected but isolated forest islands within a matrix of overall deforestation, and increased conflict between local residents and forest managers. A broader landscape vision for forest management needs to be developed, that involves local communities with forest protection and enables their decision-making on forest management outside strict protected areas.

Source: The Influence of Forest Management Regimes on Deforestation in a Central Indian Dry Deciduous Forest Landscape