New WSU podcast shares insights for healthy and safe forests

By Seth Truscott
Washington State University Extension Foresters launched a new podcast this fall to help Pacific Northwest landowners, and anyone who loves the woods, better understand and protect forests.

Co-hosts Sean Alexander and Patrick Shults, foresters for northeast and southwest Washington, respectively, created the Forest Overstory podcast as a new avenue for woodland education.

“WSU Extension Forestry is focused on continuing education for the public, and that includes adapting to new ways of sharing information,” Alexander said. “Podcasts let you have an informal conversation, really get down to the bottom of a subject in a way that you can’t in traditional presentations.”

Forest Overstory will examine issues and discoveries about wildfire, forest health, genetics and ecosystems, wildlife habitat, sustainable harvests, agroforestry, and other relevant topics.

The name is a play on words, referring to the overstory of forests—foliage, canopy, and crowns—as well as the broad stories hosts plan to explore.

“We want to interview professionals and talk about what they do, introduce lesser known fields, and bring in active landowners to share success stories and insights that people can apply to their land,” Alexander said.

“The field of forestry is changing all the time,” said Shults. “We’re always learning new things, and the podcast is a great opportunity to bring professionals and landowners who are doing something different into the limelight.”

“All of the information will help forest owners, but anybody who loves trees is going to be interested,” he added.

Hosts will release a new episode every month, and welcome show ideas and feedback. Their first episode, posted Oct. 1, 2021, discussed fire and the landscape with U.S. Forest Service scientist Paul Hessburg. The series is funded by the Foresters Fund of the Society of American Foresters, which promotes education for sustainable forest management.

Listen to the Forest Overstory on Soundcloud, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, and Stitcher, or visit the podcast web site on WSU Extension Forestry.

Source: New WSU podcast shares insights for healthy and safe forests – WSU Insider, 2021-10-25

Project Learning Tree Canada launches new video series to introduce young Canadians to forest careers

Young Canadians can now discover careers in the forest and conservation sector thanks to Project Learning Tree Canada’s (PLT Canada) new Green Jobs video series. The first video in the seven-part series is being released today to celebrate National Forest Week.

The episode, hosted by Registered Professional Forester Lacey Rose, features Jennifer Tallman, Chief Forester for EACOM timber (an SFI-certified organization) and the first female chief forester in Ontario. Rose tags along as Tallman performs different parts of her job and explains why it is important to manage forests sustainably for the long-term health of our planet and communities.

The series, which was shot in Ontario and British Columbia, speaks primarily to young people who are interested in the outdoors and who have yet to embark on their career paths. Each episode spotlights a different forestry professional who explains why their job is important for the environment, how society benefits from the work they do, and the various education and career pathways that led them to their unique green jobs.

“In the next decade, one-third of the forest sector’s workforce is set to retire,” says Kathy Abusow, President and CEO of PLT Canada. “It is critical that the forest sector, educators, teachers, and government all work together to inspire and support the next generation of forest and conservation leaders. With this series, we’re hoping that young people across the country will be inspired to pursue these incredible job opportunities. Youth can also access our work experience and mentorship programs, which help them gain the skills they need to enter the workforce and advance their careers. By educating, inspiring, and offering professional development opportunities for youth, we are supporting communities coast-to-coast-to-coast and helping to grow a diverse and resilient green jobs workforce.”

The first episode in the series, featuring Jennifer Tallman, Chief Forester for EACOM, is available at pltcanada.org/green-jobs-video-series. PLT Canada will be releasing a new episode every month until March 2022. Future episodes will feature a Lead Scientist, a Roads and Operations Supervisor, an Indigenous Relationships Manager, and other important green jobs professionals.

View the first episode, take the Green Jobs Career Personality Quiz and much more at pltcanada.org.

A video accompanying this announcement is available at: https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/62fbe337-681c-499c-b9f6-3d0467e57b1d

Source: Project Learning Tree Canada launches new video series to introduce young Canadians to forest careers – GlobeNewswire, 2021-09-24

A forestry legacy connects generations

A 50-year forestry anniversary complements CSU’s 115-year forestry legacy we celebrate this sesquicentennial year.

by Karina Puikkonen
There’s something you need to know about forests.

They change.

Year after year, saplings reach toward sunlit sky with protection from the mature canopy trees above. When they are strong enough to stand and large enough to shield, they become part of the canopy too and begin adding to the collective strength of the forest. The cycle renews.

Forests persist and adapt. It’s a beautiful natural cycle and a fitting metaphor for the people who have built Colorado State University’s forestry legacy. Forestry students, alumni, faculty, and staff, honor 20th century roots while being stewards of progress.

Fall 2019 marks the 50th anniversary of the Society of American Foresters (SAF) Alpha Chapter. The Alpha title designates a milestone for both the university and a professional society that advances the sustainable management of forest resources. CSU Alpha was the first SAF student chapter in the nation.

The Alpha seed rooted in the good ground of CSU’s enduring forestry program. Luminaries of this legacy stand among student saplings rising to join them as pillars in this specialized field. While following the well-trodden path their forbearers laid, students in the Alpha chapter also recognize they must blaze their own way in a rapidly changing climate.

Source: A forestry legacy connects generations – Warner College of Natural Resources, 2019-11-06